The Coomloughra Horseshoe: Walking Back Out

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Walking back out from the Beenkeragh Ridge alongside Coomloughra Lough.

 

I’d had a fantastic day’s walking on the Coomloughra Horseshoe, even though I hadn’t been able to fully complete it due to dangerously high winds.  Starting out from the car park near the start of the Hydro Track, I’d taken a route over Cnoc Iochtair, Skregmore, Stumpa Barr na hAbhannBeenkeragh and The Bones Peak.  I’d turned at the Bones Peak and took a steep route down off the ridge to walk out slightly above Lough Eagher, Coomloughra Lough and Lough Eighter.  I was glad it remained dry as the steep, grassy slope coming down from the ridge could have been slippery and dangerous otherwise.  As I reached lower, flatter ground it did start to rain, and I didn’t get many photos until I had almost passed Coomloughra Lough.  I did manage to shield the camera for a few shots of lichen patterns on some of the purple sandstone rocks on the slopes.

 

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It soon began to clear up again and I was able to get some wider shots alongside the loughs.

 

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Approaching Lough Eighter, also known as Lough Iochtair.

 

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Blue sky beginning to appear.

 

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Looking backwards.

 

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At the end of Lough Eighter, about to rejoin the Hydro Track.

 

After coming down the steep side of the Beenkeragh Ridge, I found I was having a very easy, pleasant walk back to my starting point.  Even on the open hillside, conditions were dry underfoot, and there was no high vegetation to battle through.  Once I passed the end of Lough Eighter, things would get even easier as I was back on the Hydro Track that would take me all the way back to the car park.  I also found myself walking in increasingly pleasant sunshine, which was unseasonably warm for October, and the wind was much less strong at this lower altitude.

 

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Increasingly sunny as I started off down the Hydro Track.

 

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The track takes a sharp turn northwards here, through the gate.

 

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Looking down on Lough Acoose.

 

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The slopes of Cnoc Iochtair coming in on the right, with Skregbeg behind.

 

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The mountainous Dingle Peninsula in the distance, constantly drew the eye on this section of the Hydro Track.

 

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The closer views were also stunning, towards Knocknabrone Hill (or Derryfanga) and Lough Nanoon.

 

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Looking up at the slopes of Cnoc Iochtair, the first mountain that I had climbed earlier in the day.

 

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The track ahead and Skregbeg.

 

 

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The Hydro Track takes another sharp turn, to the west this time, about half a kilometer or so from the car park, and I was on the home straight – an easy downhill stretch.

 

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Back in the car park, and a final view of Knocknabrone Hill/Derryfanga through the Autumn foliage.

 

It was nice to be back at the car with all the comforts that it held – water and a towel, clean socks and footwear, and lunch to be eaten in the sunshine as I rested before the long drive home.  I always feel a deep contentment after a walk like this, and weary legs or sore feet just seem to make the experience more valuable.  I would highly recommend exploring this stunning part of the MacGillycuddy’s Reeks.

 

 

6 thoughts on “The Coomloughra Horseshoe: Walking Back Out

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