Walking Around Horn Head Part 1

IMG_3086donesmall

Thrift, or Sea Pink, along the cliff tops around Horn Head.

 

I’ve previously posted on Horn Head, (https://aidymcglynn.wordpress.com/2014/08/04/horn-head/) where I’d taken a walk up to the top of Croaghnamaddy hill on the east of the peninsula, then driven west, before taking a walk out to the Napoleonic watch tower.  From the tower ruins, I had seen the coast stretching westwards, with more dramatic cliffs, and I planned to return and walk along them another day.  In May, I set off, starting near the watch tower, to go a little further along the coast.  A late start meant I wouldn’t get all the way round past the cliffs to Tramore beach on the western edge, but that just gives me a reason to return again to this spectacular area.

 

My starting point was the small parking area where the road comes to a dead end near Coastguard Hill, and setting off north, there were great views straight away, over to the seaward cliffs of Croaghnamaddy Hill, and also the cliffs to the north.

 

IMG_2641donesmall

 

 

IMG_2649donesmall

 

 

IMG_2653donesmall

 

 

IMG_2657donesmall

 

 

IMG_2660donesmall

 

 

IMG_2665donesmall

 

 

IMG_2667donesmall

 

 

IMG_2670donesmall

 

 

IMG_2672donesmall

 

 

IMG_2676small

A sea arch far below.

 

IMG_2684donesmall

 

 

IMG_2693donesmall

 

On this stretch, the watch tower ruins formed a clearly visible landmark to aim for initially.  The watch tower was built during the Napoleonic Wars, to guard against invasion by Napoleon’s forces.

 

IMG_2697donesmall

The watch tower ruins on the high ground ahead.

 

IMG_2698donesmall

 

I took a bit of time here to photograph the tower and peer over the steep drops to the sea a few metres away.

 

IMG_2708donesmall

 

 

IMG_2709donesmall

 

 

IMG_2711small

 

 

IMG_2713donesmall

 

 

IMG_2721donesmall

 

The next stage was the short walk to Horn Head itself, one of the many high headlands on the coastline of the peninsula.

 

IMG_2723donesmall

 

 

IMG_2727donesmall

 

 

IMG_2743donesmall

 

 

IMG_2754donesmall

 

 

IMG_2757small

 

 

IMG_2772donesmall

 

 

IMG_2775donesmall

 

 

IMG_2782donesmall

This narrow projection was a dizzying viewpoint.

 

 

IMG_2792donesmall

Views now along the length of the cliffs to the west on the northern edge of the peninsula.

 

IMG_2801donesmall

 

 

IMG_2807small

 

 

IMG_2809donesmall

The high, jutting viewpoint I had been nervously standing on a few moments earlier.

 

IMG_2811small

 

 

IMG_2814donesmall

That viewpoint again from a different perspective.

 

IMG_2820small

Steep drops.

 

IMG_2822donesmall

 

 

IMG_2830donesmall

It is this “horn” which gives the peninsula its name, and seen from futher west it is a more obvious analogy as some of the later photos hopefully illustrate.

 

From the horn-like prominence, I now wandered west along the indented cliffs.  Under moody skies, with the Atlantic crashing at their feet, the cliffs on this stretch of coastline are a perfect embodiment of “The Wild Atlantic Way”.

 

IMG_2836donesmall

 

 

IMG_2842donesmall

 

 

IMG_2855donesmall

 

 

IMG_2905donesmall

 

 

IMG_2910donesmall

You can see the “horn” from the name Horn Head clearly from this direction.

 

IMG_2919donesmall

 

 

IMG_2926small

 

 

IMG_2935donesmall

 

 

IMG_3002donesmall

 

 

IMG_3023donesmall

 

 

IMG_3030donesmall

Deep indentations and caves in the cliffs, worn away by the Atlantic onslaught.

 

IMG_3044donesmall

 

 

IMG_3057donesmall

 

 

IMG_3062donesmall

 

 

IMG_3088donesmall

 

Continued in Part 2

 

 

 

3 thoughts on “Walking Around Horn Head Part 1

  1. This looks a really interesting place as well as one that has spectacular scenery. I wonder what the rocks are? They look very different from ones that have featured elsewhere on your expeditions.

    1. One source that i’ve read stated that the rock here is quartzite, sandstone that has metamorphised into quartz. Part 2 probably has some closer views of the rocks which might help to identify it, particularly someone with your knowledge Jessica. If it is quartzite, that would be the same type of rock as is found on Errigal and Muckish Mountains.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s