3 Peaks In The Bluestacks Part 2: Croaghbarnes

IMG_8732donesmall

Summit cairn on Croaghbarnes, looking over to Croaghbane.

 

In Part 1 I’d got as far as Lough Belshade on my walk into the Bluestack Mountains.  From there, I was able to see my next destination – Croaghbarnes, as its steep western slopes dropped down to the lough.  I followed the Corraber River southeast a little to where the slopes were a bit less steep, and began to ascend the southwest side of the mountain.  It was a pleasant climb up the boulder strewn mountainside, with increasingly good views over Lough Belshade to the higher Bluestacks ridge in the west, south to Lough Eske, and beyond to Donegal Bay and the Dartry Mountains, and southeast to Croaghagranagh, Croaghanirwore and Croaghnageer.

 

IMG_8603donesmall

Lough Belshade, which I had walked up to in Part 1.

 

IMG_8605donesmall

Looking towards Croaghnageer.

 

IMG_8607donesmall

Looking uphill on the way up Croaghbarnes.  The real summit was beyond this false summit.

 

IMG_8609donesmall

 

 

IMG_8610donesmall

The steep eastern side of Croaghgorm and the Ardnageer summits.

 

IMG_8623donesmall

 

 

IMG_8627donesmall

 

 

IMG_8629donesmall

A look back at the way I had come up, from Lough Eske, along the Corraber River valley.

 

IMG_8634donesmall

 

 

IMG_8636donesmall

Lough Eske.

 

IMG_8644donesmall

 

 

IMG_8646donesmall

 

 

IMG_8648donesmall

 

 

IMG_8657donesmall

 

 

IMG_8659donesmall

Lough Belshade and Croaghgorm receding as I continued upwards.

 

IMG_8664donesmall

 

 

IMG_8668donesmall

Lough Eske, with the Dartry Mountains on the horizon.

 

Reaching the false summit, I entered a flatter area, with several small lakes.  The real summit and a few other little rises, stood to the northeast.  I began to pick a route around the loughs towards the summit.

 

IMG_8673donesmall

 

 

IMG_8676xdonesmall

 

 

IMG_8681donesmall

 

 

IMG_8684donesmall

 

 

IMG_8685donesmall

Croaghbane peeping up from behind a little rise.

 

IMG_8688donesmall

 

 

IMG_8692donesmall

 

 

IMG_8698donesmall

 

 

IMG_8706donesmall

 

 

IMG_8709donesmall

 

 

IMG_8712donesmall

 

IMG_8713donesmall

 

 

IMG_8724small

Almost at the top, and there were now good views of a dramatic looking Croaghbane.

 

Just past the loughs I arrived at the summit marked by a small cairn.  A new vista opened up now too, across to a forbidding looking Croaghbane, as its eastern flank dropped steeply down to the bleak, but beautiful Owendoo River valley.

 

IMG_8735donesmall

The summit cairn.

 

IMG_8738donesmall

 

 

IMG_8743donesmall

Looking north to Gaugin Mountain, and the line of the Derryveagh Mountains in the distance.

 

IMG_8744donesmall

I found Croaghbane to be an impressive sight from this angle, and took several shots.

 

IMG_8746donesmall

 

 

IMG_8751donesmall

 

 

IMG_8754small

Looking down into the Owendoo valley.

 

IMG_8767donesmall

 

 

IMG_8776donesmall

 

 

IMG_8779small

 

 

IMG_8786small

Looking northeast, where I would be heading next, for Meenanea and Cronamuck.

 

After a good pause at the summit, I began to drop down from Croaghbarnes, moving northeast towards my final destination, the neighbouring peaks of Meenanea and Cronamuck.

 

IMG_8792donesmall

A look back at the summit of Croaghbarnes on the left, and Croaghbane on the right.

 

In Part 3, I’ll continue the walk to Meenanea and Cronamuck.

 

 

6 thoughts on “3 Peaks In The Bluestacks Part 2: Croaghbarnes

  1. Such a dramatic landscape. Somehow it made me think of the scenery in Iceland but that may have been something to do with the pockets of snow still on the ground.

    1. Thank you Clare – that’s a very complimentary comment and its great to think of someone being introduced to these areas. All the more pleasing too, to get such a comment from an artist like yourself.

    1. Cheers Martin. Its a great walk that all round, but probably one of the most tiring I’ve done. Some dramatic views in there in the heart of the Bluestacks make it worth it.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s